3/25/11

Where's GLADYS KALLMAN?


This weeks Sepia Saturday post is again "Where's Gladys Kallman?"

There is nothing written on the back of this photo, but from previous posts about Gladys I think you should be able to find her.

Click on image to see it larger.

I really love these kids. A bunch of fine characters. It seems to have been a theme for this photographer to have kids pose with a favorite toy. I've found others online.

Now, settle in and find Gladys.





Think of all the life stories here. The expressions on the kids faces speak volumes. Perfect jumping off points for numerous stories.

Click here, here, and here to see similar photos by the same photography studio, Frances Thompson Studio in San Francisco. And here is another photo that is for sale showing the kids holding toys.

This photo is from the George Kallman estate.

I have not found any historical information about the photographer.

UPDATE: Reader Paul A. Peterson has provided the following information about the photographer, Frances Thompson. Thanks Paul and I'm envious of your collection.
The photographer, Frances Thompson, was born 26 Jan 1867 in CA, and died 10 May 1947 in San Francisco, CA. Her mother's maiden name is Satterler. In about 1912, Frances married a clergyman, Webster Loring Clark (1865-1946). In 1935, she operated a studio located at 545 Post St., San Francisco. I own 19 examples of her work, class photos dating from 1914 to 1935.

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I have a new design up at Cafe Press, My ABC's, perfect for the little grade school students in the house. Or maybe the teacher who teaches them. Then again, at my age a little visual aid for memory purposes is always helpful!


You can find various items at my Tattered and Lost Cafe Press shop.














22 comments:

  1. These photographs are wonderful. I have studied the children's faces, they are so beautiful and innocent. They look with anticipation into a world waiting for them.

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  2. I love the little girl on the left who has a Shirley Temple hairdo. I bet her mother was ready to take her off to Hollywood. Wonder if she could tap dance.
    Great photo. I've never seen one like this with kids holding toys. interesting.
    Nancy
    Ladies of the Grove

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  3. I love the design of the studio's logo.

    I can't tell how old the kids are, but maybe it was a kindergarten where they played with toys.

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  4. Everything about this photo is wonderful - from the blue designs on the frame to the haircuts and missing teeth and the beautiful dolls and teddy bears. The charming faces are most charming of all. I'd like to adopt every one of them!
    So, which one is Gladys. I had two guesses. One is the girl with the tight curls and the other is the one in the front row holding the big doll.

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  5. An enthralling class photo, thank you T+L, and even more fascinating when viewed in conjunction with the other examples that you found. I have been collecting class photos for a while, in a small way, but I've not come across any with quite the sense of fun that Frances Thompson managed to put into hers ... the woman's touch, I'm sure.

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  6. Fantastic photograph. I couldn't find Gladys, but it was a delight just gazing on these faces

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  7. Ding. Ding. Ding. Christine has nailed it. Gladys is indeed in the front row, second large photo, large doll.

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  8. What a wonderful variety of faces and expressions. The doll in the first close up is a bit scary though! :-) Jo

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  9. I managed to spot her with my second guess. How wonderful, I suspect that if I was to run into her at the supermarket this afternoon, I would recognise her and say something like "I was only looking at some old photos of you this morning". But I suppose that is unlikely in Yorkshire in 2011

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  10. I wonder if there was competition among the girls about which doll was larger, or had nicer hair or clothes, or.... It is such fun to look at this photo. Since it's dated, it's a great study in clothing, toys, and hairstles. And I noticed the round glasses you mentioned. I noticed that several of the children looked bigger/older than the others. I wonder if it was mixed grades. Great photo! Thanks for sharing.

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  11. How cute they all are! Love the girls in their bob haircuts!

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  12. Beautiful photo. Very interesting to see the young hair styles imitating adult and movie fashions.

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  13. Most of the lads look serious and the majority are wearing braces (suspenders). How did the photographer get them to have such tidy hair?

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  14. What a clear and beautiful photo! You are right, there are many, many stories that can be thought up by looking at it.

    Thanks so much for stopping by to say hello the other day. I am finally getting caught up around here.

    Take care, and have a wonderful week.

    Kathy

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  15. Looks like a casting call for the Our Gang comedies. Love the Harold Lloyd glasses on some of 'em!

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  16. Definitely a few home haircuts in there I reckon.

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  17. Oh yes, Harold Lloyd glasses. That's who I was thinking of and couldn't come up with the name. A very long senior moment.

    I'm just so thrilled so many people enjoy looking at these photos. It's one of those hobbies/collections that can be hard to explain, but here I don't have to.

    Thank you for that.

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  18. You are so right - each face is so amazing! I love the dolls. There are some real characters here, that's for sure - and I love their hair cuts from home. ( I had a few of those back in my day).

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  19. Paul A. Peterson5/28/2012

    The photographer, Frances Thompson, was born 26 Jan 1867 in CA, and died 10 May 1947 in San Francisco, CA. Her mother's maiden name is Satterler. In about 1912, Frances married a clergyman, Webster Loring Clark (1865-1946). In 1935, she operated a studio located at 545 Post St., San Francisco. I own 19 examples of her work, class photos dating from 1914 to 1935.

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    Replies
    1. Anonymous6/13/2013

      This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

      Delete
    2. No, sorry, I haven't.

      Delete
  20. Thank you Paul. I'm always appreciative of information about the photographers. I'll include your information in the post.

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