10/10/14

The MASONIC LODGE in Awali, Bahrain


If you want to know where your husband is in the evening be sure to check the Masonic Lodge. Looks like a fun place if you like Quonset huts in the desert.


Click on image to see it larger.

Have you ever been in a Quonset hut on a hot day? Memorable experience. There were several still on and off base in Hawaii when I lived there. In fact, my Brownie troop met in a Quonset hut. I still remember the stack of hula hoops sitting outside the door. Brown hula hoops…a lot of them!

I can't guarantee this is the exact place they're talking about, but it is an article about a Masonic Lodge in Bahrain. By government decree they no longer exist in Bahrain. Never would have seen that coming.

Another snapshot from Donald G. Schnabel's tour of Bahrain in 1957 and my submission for this week's Sepia Saturday. Not the least bit on theme, but I imagine a weary traveler would have some pleasant company here.

18 comments:

  1. There used to be a quonset hut on the grounds where my scout troop met when I was a kid. What is it about quonset huts and scout troops?

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    1. Little sardines packed in tins?

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  2. “Of all the gin joints, in all the towns, in all the world, ..." a Masonic lodge in Bahrain wins a prize for clubs in unexpected places. Even a girl scout troop would seem more likely.
    It's fascinating how your slide show of Mr. Schnabel's photographs continues to increase our knowledge of a distant culture and era. Sweden, Bahrain, California - what's next?

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    1. I too have been fascinated by these snapshots. I never really knew anything about Bahrain other than the high rises and the fact that most of the people who live there aren't citizens.

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  3. I've been in a couple of quonset huts - one on a navy base when my uncle was in the navy; & once on a U.S. Forest Service station; but never in the sun on a hot day, thank goodness. Both times the weather was cold & dreary & the huts were quite chilly, so I can imagine what they might be like in the hot sun. Yuk.

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    1. And imagine with swamp coolers!

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  4. I've never been in a Quonset hut, and I didn't even know that Bahrain wasn't a newer country.

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    1. Well then this post was worth it. I let you know about two things.

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  5. I wasn't on theme either really this week. I only seem to remember stopping in Bahrain on my way to the UK in the 70s - fuel stop me thinks.

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    1. You might want to look a the post I did about the airport in 1957. It might have looked similar when you passed through.

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  6. In Australia those buildings are called Nissen huts.

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    1. Both you and Bob have enlightened me about the history of Quoinset huts by mentioning Nissen huts.

      http://www.history.navy.mil/faqs/faq75-1.htm

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  7. I had to look Quonset huts up and now I know why when I first saw your photo I thought of Nissen huts which I experienced during National Service - no sleep when it rained and definitely cooler than when in the desert like your Quonsets.

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    1. Interesting that our Quonsets came from your Nissen huts.

      http://www.history.navy.mil/faqs/faq75-1.htm

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  8. Oh my what and idea, a post on all the many wild and exciting, and perhaps ho hum sometimes things that have happened in quonset huts! We've had them even as houses in Minnesota, long ago of course!

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    1. It would be fun to do a book about how they're being used now. Usually when I see them they're terribly rundown.

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  9. How educational! I’d never heard of quonset huts, but now I know they are Nissen huts it makes a world of difference!

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    1. It is fun to find out we call them by different names.

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