4/17/14

HARVESTING THE CROPS and Buckaroos and Buckarettes


My submission for this week's Sepia Saturday is a rather lovely scene of "gardening" on a larger scale than the Sepia photo. Sadly the photo is not in good shape, but it still reminds me of a sketch that might have been done for an old painting. I have no idea where it might have been taken, but imagine the architecture of the houses would be a good clue. If anyone has any suggestions I'd love to hear them. Click on the image to see it larger.


Click on image to see it larger.

Buckaroos and Buckarettes

The second part of my post is a repost from a couple days ago introducing the latest book in my Tattered and Lost series.

Do you have memories of riding the range though you never left your neighborhood? You might have been a buckaroo or buckarette.

Do you remember thinking you could vanquish the bad guys with a song in your heart and a six-gun on your hip? You might have been a buckaroo or buckarette.

Do you remember singing Happy Trails and knowing all the words? You might have been a buckaroo or buckarette.

Introducing the latest volume in the Tattered and Lost series of vintage snapshot books available at Amazon. Tattered and Lost: Buckaroos and Buckarettes should easily fill that void of forgotten memories when all kids dreamt of joining their heroes Roy, Gene, Hoppy, and Annie. You'll smile, you'll laugh, you'll wonder how you ever lost the dream.

Need a special gift for someone? Tattered and Lost: Buckaroos and Buckarettes might just be what you're looking for. Sure to start conversations for people of any age.

104 pages with 94 photos, available at Amazon. Photos from the early part of the 20th Century through the early 1960s.





26 comments:

  1. Those houses, and the people harvesting, have a very European look to them, but I suppose they could be from almost anywhere.

    Good luck with the book sales. Those images remind me of some taken of me in a similar cowboy costume.

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    1. I will always wonder about the photo. Only thing I'm sure of is it wasn't taken in the US.

      Thanks Brett. Lucky you have photos of yourself as a buckaroo!

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  2. I was a buckarette (though I never heard that word before), and I have I photo of myself in my cowboy outfit.

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  3. Your painting does indeed look like a painting I've seen.

    One Christmas my cousins got cowboy and cowgirl outfits complete with little guns and holsters. I was so jealous.

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    1. There's a photo in the book where there are two boys with a girl standing between them. The boys have guns and holsters, but nothing else. On the other hand the girl is dressed in a full get-up including chaps. The boys look so jealous.

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  4. Tiefland, northern Germany. Flat plains, some rolling hills, and a tradition of farmers living in villages and working the land communally.

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    1. Thanks. I did think the houses looked northern European.

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  5. Like most kids, my brother & sisters & I played cowboys with those little silver six-shooters & the one thing I remember about it most - & we all still laugh about it whenever someone brings it up - is the "Let's pretend . . . " part - as in "Let's pretend you missed me because I jumped behind a rock at the last minute." Or "Let's pretend you forgot you already shot six bullets so your gun was empty." ANYTHING to keep the game going! :))

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    1. Yes! We made it up as we went along. Play was not organized. We didn't need computers. We weren't inside all day. We couldn't wait to get outside and continue from the day before. We fell down, we scrapped our knees, we ran into trees…and we survived just fine.

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  6. Anonymous4/18/2014

    This is fantastic. Jim Linderman

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    1. Thank you Jim. That is high praise.

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  7. A lovely rural scene which I agree looks both European and familiar.

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    1. I wish it was a clearer shot and not so badly damaged. Might make it easier to see the details. But I think WJY might have nailed it with it being Germany.

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  8. i'm afraid my playing days were all dolls, books and girlie things. But your harvesting photo reminds me of one of my great-grandfather in England in the 1890s bringing in the hay by hand with the help of his wife and a neighbour.

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    1. I hope in the future you post this shot of your great-grandfather. I'd love to see it.

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  9. I had a cowgirl outfit in the 1950s but never had a picture taken in it. My sister had a cowboy outfit. Happy trails to you, until we meet again. Happy trails to you, keep smiling until then...

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    1. You're like me. I had Dale Evans and Annie Oakley outfits, but no pictures of me in either of them. My outfits, guns, and cowboy hat all got lost in storage while we lived in Hawaii.

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  10. A beautiful image that as you say, could be a painting. I see a European town as well, but I can't spot the best clue, a church steeple. The styles of Catholic, Lutheran, Anglican churches are distinctive even from a distance. But maybe the photo is better for being a universal picture.

    And congrads on another photo book. YippeeYi Kiyay!

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    1. Nope, I don't see any churches. Just steep roofed houses.

      And thanks. I enjoyed putting the book together and I get lost in it when I sit and look at all the kids.

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  11. Yes the photographer got the rule of thirds right in their composition.

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    1. Luck or intention? We'll never know.

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  12. The photograph reminds me of several field paintings including a Van Gogh and a Millet.

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    1. I too thought of Van Gogh. A sketch from which he'd have painted something amazing.

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  13. Wow, what fun these photos are! It stresses how we really need a bit more cowboys in the world too!

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    1. Indeed. And the chance for kids to use their imaginations to just have fun, not organized fun.

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